Who Are Catholic Saints

As Catholics celebrate All Saints Day on 1st November, some non-Catholics probably are curious who are these holy people, why does the Church include All Saints’ Day in their calendar of solemn feasts and why does the Apostles’ Creed include “the communion of saints” as one of the 12 essential articles of our faith.

Catholics do not worship saints, but the saints are near and dear to Catholic hearts. Catholics respect and honor the saints and consider them to be the heroes of the Church. The Church emphasizes that they were ordinary people from ordinary families, and they were totally human.

A saint (also historically known as a hallow) is a person who is recognized as having an exceptional degree of holiness or likeness or closeness to God. Depending on the context and denomination, the term also retains its original Christian meaning, as any believer who is “in Christ” and in whom Christ dwells, whether in Heaven or on Earth. Broadly speaking, are all people who follow Jesus Christ and live their lives according to His teaching. Catholics, however, also use the term more narrowly to refer to especially holy men and women who, by persevering in the Christian Faith and living extraordinary lives of virtue, have already entered Heaven.Read More »