Posts from the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Saint Teresa of Avila

Saint Teresa of Ávila, also called Saint Teresa of Jesus, baptized as Teresa Sánchez de Cepeda y Ahumada (28 March 1515 – 4 October 1582), in Ávila, Spain, from rigid and pious parents. When she was seven-years-old, she convinced her older brother that they should “go off to the land of the Moors and beg them, out of love of God, to cut off our heads there.” They got as far as the road from the city before an uncle found them and brought them back.

After this incident she led a fairly ordinary life, though she was convinced that she was a horrible sinner. As a teenager, she cared only about boys, clothes, flirting, and rebelling. When she was 16, her father decided she was out of control and sent her to a convent. At first she hated it but eventually she began to enjoy it — partly because of her growing love for God, and partly because the convent was a lot less strict than her father and she thought that it was the only safe place for someone as prone to sin as she was.

Once installed at the Carmelite convent permanently, she started to learn and practice mental prayer, in which she “tried as hard as I could to keep Jesus Christ present within me… My imagination is so dull that I had no talent for imagining or coming up with great theological thoughts.” Teresa prayed this way off and on for eighteen years without feeling that she was getting results. Part of the reason for her trouble was that the convent was not the safe place she assumed it would be. Read more…

“God is God. Because he is God, He is worthy of my trust and obedience. I will find rest nowhere but in His holy will that is unspeakably beyond my largest notions of what he is up to.”

“God is God. Because he is God, He is worthy of my trust and obedience. I will find rest nowhere but in His holy will that is unspeakably beyond my largest notions of what he is up to.” ~ Elisabeth Elliot

#MoralStory: The Secret Ingredient

A girl was watching her mother cooking a dish in the kitchen. On the shelf, there were several containers, neatly labelled, each containing cooking ingredients like salt, sugar, oil, vinegar or a spice. The mother opened the lids of the containers in a definite order and added the required amount of each ingredient into the cooking pot which was heated on a stove. Finally, she opened the last container and looked inside for a while and then closed it without taking anything from it. Then she served the delicious dish to everyone with great love. The children relished the dishes with a smile. This happened every day.

One day, the mother was too sick to cook. Her daughter agreed to do the cooking. She followed the mother’s recipe. The girl examined the labels of every container while trying to follow the directions of her mother. She found that the last container did not carry a label and so ignored it. She placed the cooking pot on the stove and put on the flame.

When the dish was getting ready, out of curiosity, she opened the unlabelled container, which her mother used to open, observe and close like a ritual every day. She was surprised to find there was only one small card in that container, with something written on it; Read more…

In Bread We Bring You Lord

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In bread we bring you Lord, our body’s’ labour
In wine we offer you our spirit’s grief.
We do not ask you, Lord, who is my neighbor?
But stand united now, in one belief.
For we have gladly heard your Word, your holy Word
And now in answer, Lord, our gifts we bring.
Our selfish hearts make true, our failing faith renew,
Our life belongs to you, our Lord and King.

The bread we offer you is blessed and broken,
And it becomes for us our spirit’s food.
Over the cup we bring, your Word is spoken;
Make it your gift to us, your healing blood.
Take all that daily toil, plants in our heart’s poor soil,
Take all we start and spoil, each hopeful dream.
The chances we have missed, the graces we resist,
Lord, in thy Eucharist, take and redeem.

* Read more…

#ShortNews: New works by Raphael discovered at Vatican?

Experts working on the restoration of frescoes in the Hall of Constantine, in the Vatican’s apostolic palace, have discovered two works which they attribute to the Renaissance master Raphael.

Raphael had planned the frescoes for the Hall of Constantine, but died before the work was completed. The frescoes were completed by his students. However, restorers are convinced that two figures were actually the work of Raphael himself.

http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/unknown-raphael-paintings-discovered-vatican-180963999/

#ShortNews: Papal backing for ‘Laudato Si’ Pledge Campaign’

Pope Francis has endorsed an effort by the Global Catholic Climate Movement to persuade 1 million Catholics to show their support for Laudato Si‘ by pledging to live more simply and to pray for the protection of the environment.

The “Laudato Si‘ Pledge Campaign” has already been endorsed by Cardinal Peter Turkson, the head of the Vatican’s new dicastery for intergral human development; and by Cardinals Reinhard Marx of Munich and Blase Cupich of Chicago.

http://catholicclimatemovement.global/

#ShortNews: ‘An ecumenism of hate’

In an article entitled “An ecumenism of hate,” the July 14 edition of the Vatican newspaper offered a four-paragraph summary of a Civilta Cattolica essay decrying a “Manichean” strain in American conservatism and a political alliance between Catholics and Evangelical Protestants.

The Civilta Cattolica essay was written by Father Antonio Spadaro, the journal’s editor, who has been a regular adviser to the Pontiff; and Marcelo Figueroa, the Argentine Presbyterian pastor who was asked by Pope Francis to launch that nation’s edition of L’Osservatore Romano.

http://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=32105