Be Born In Me (Mary’s Song)

*

Everything inside me cries for order
Everything inside me wants to hide
Is this shadow an angel or a warrior?
If God is pleased with me, why I am I so terrified?
Someone tell me I am only dreaming
Somehow help me see with Heaven’s eyes
And before my head agrees, my heart is on it’s knees.
Holy is He. Blessed am I.

Be born in me. Be born in me.
Trembling heart, somehow I believe
that You chose me
I’ll hold you in the beginning,
You will hold me in the end

Every moment in the middle,
make my heart your Bethlehem
Be born in me
All this time we’ve waited for the promise

All this time You’ve waited for my arms
Did You wrap yourself inside the unexpected
So we might know that Love would go that far?
Be born in me, be born in me
Trembling heart, somehow I believe

that You chose me
I’ll hold you in the beginning,
You will hold me in the end
Every moment in the middle,
make my heart your Bethlehem
Be born in me

I am not brave
I’ll never be
The only thing my heart can offer is a vacancy
I’m just a girl
Nothing more
But I am willing, I am Yours
Be born in me, be born in me
I’ll hold you in the beginning,
You will hold me in the end
Every moment in the middle,
make my heart your Bethlehem
Be born in me

Advent Week-1 (2019): The Candle Of Hope

The Advent season is a beautiful reminder to prepare our hearts as we prepare our homes — to celebrate the birth of our Savior, Jesus! At the start of this week, we light the first of the four candles in the Advent wreath: the candle of Hope.

Is your heart filled with hope? Do you have a confident expectation of your tomorrow? What happens when the road ahead is filled with loss and stress weighs your shoulders down? When confident expectation for tomorrow dwindles, what can you do? How can you walk in hope when you feel hopeless inside?

In one word, the answer to confident expectation is “JESUS” — the Jesus of Christmas.

Hope in Jesus comes from more than just a belief that He was once a baby in a manger. This hope in Him has been called “an anchor for the soul.” It is something deep within that secures you through the storms of life.

HOPE FOR HELP

We are invited to come to Him and confidently ask for help. Hebrews 4:16 tells us, “to come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in our time of need” (Hebrews 4:16).

HOPE TO OVERCOME

Things that leave one feeling powerless and hopeless come in many forms. With Christ’s strength you can overcome great obstacles, and faith in Jesus gives hope and help to overcome: “and this is the victory that overcomes the world, even our faith” (1 John 5:4).

HOPE FOR POWER

Sometimes in life we find ourselves with a task that simply looks too big for us. We do not just need a cup of God’s strength added to our own; rather, we need His strength in us to do what we need to do. He will give it! 2 Corithians 12:9 says, “My grace is sufficient for you: for my strength is made perfect in weakness.” Seeing our weakness as the entry point of God’s strength gives access to His power!

HOPE FOR ETERNITY

Read More »

A Visit and a Song (Part 01/04)

By Debie Thomas

The angel Gabriel leaves, and Mary runs. “With haste,” the Gospel writer tells us on this fourth Sunday in Advent, a newly pregnant teenager makes for the hills, not slowing down until she reaches the home of Elizabeth, her also-pregnant cousin. When her kinswoman welcomes her, she bursts into song — a song so subversive, governments twenty centuries later ban its public recitation.

love this Gospel story. I love it because it’s one of the rare narratives in the Bible that is female-centered. (The priest Zechariah — Elizabeth’s husband, and the man-presumably-in-charge — is literally silenced throughout.) I love it because its setting is domestic, intimate, and earthy. But most of all, I love it because it allows me to view the mother of Jesus as a whole person. To view her, in Nadia Bolz Weber’s language, “without sentimentality or cynicism.”

This is no small achievement, because we (the Church) have buried Mary under so many layers of theology, piety, and politics, she’s nearly impossible to excavate. Some of us pray to her. Others ignore her on monotheistic principle. Some call her “Theotokos,” the God-bearer. Others champion her as a model of holy femininity — ever sinless, ever virgin, ever mother. To some, she is a child prophet extraordinaire. To others, the victim of divine manipulation.

Would the real Mary please stand up? Well, I think she has. I think Luke’s account of the Visitation gives us a portrait of Mary that cuts through most of our assumptions and stereotypes. A nuanced portrait that balances fear with courage, doubt with faith, vulnerability with strength. Along the way, it gives us a portrait of ourselves — of what we, the Church, might become at our very best. Here, then, are three gifts I believe the Visitation story offers us for our Advent meditations.

The gift of community: As soon as Mary says “yes” to Gabriel’s astonishing request, she goes “in haste” to see Elizabeth. She doesn’t isolate herself. She doesn’t keep God’s revelation a secret. She doesn’t play Lone Ranger and attempt to go it alone. Instead, she seeks out a fellow-traveler

Although Luke doesn’t elaborate on Mary’s reasons for visiting Elizabeth, it’s easy to imagine why a girl with a story as crazy-sounding as hers might make such an urgent journey. Tradition tells us that Mary is only thirteen or fourteen years old when the angel Gabriel appears to her. In her cultural and religious context, her pregnancy is a scandal. At best, it renders her an object of scornful gossip. At worst, it places her at risk of death by stoning.

Needless to say, she needs safety, affirmation, empathy, and companionship. She needs someone to recognize, nurture, deepen, and celebrate the work of God in her life. Someone who will receive, not reject. Love, not judge. Nourish, not condemn.

Could there possibly be a better job description for the Church? A better prototype for Christian community? What would it be like if we sought each other out with the trust and openness of Mary? What would it be like if we (like Elizabeth) received with tenderness the marginalized and vulnerable people who dare to come to us, seeking refuge and nurture? What would it be like if our communal worship echoed the full-throated call-and-response of these two kinswomen who find themselves caught up in God’s bold, risky, world-changing work, and decide to find strength in each other’s company?

In this Gospel story, Luke essentially describes the first Christian worship service in history. Mary and Elizabeth — the young and the old, the unmarried and the married, the socially established and the socially vulnerable — finding common ground in their love for Jesus. As Henri Nouwen describes it, “God’s most radical intervention into history was listened to and received in community.” What a gorgeous and challenging example for us to live up to.

to be continued…

Post Advent: Whoever loves his brother remains in the light

It’s four days after Christmas, and the warm feelings we associate with the holidays are beginning to fade. So what now? What difference will Jesus’ coming to live among us make in our lives? How will it help us to love each other and remain “in the light” (1 John 2:8)?

For one thing, because Jesus became one of us, we now know what love looks like in real-life situations. On every page of the Gospels, he has shown us that love is about making concrete decisions to put other people’s interests before our own, He showed this by dining with people no one else wanted to associate with (Luke 19:1-10). Or feeding people who were hungry (John 6:1-15). Or asking someone suffering in silence to articulate what he needs (Luke 18:35-43). Or forgiving someone who has sinned grievously (John 8:1-11).

If this list makes it sound as if Jesus has set the bar too high for you, don’t worry. Jesus knows your strengths and weaknesses, and he is ready to help you. You don’t have to figure out how to love on your own. Jesus’ own love, his creativity, and his compassion can become your love, creativity and compassion. Slowly. Gradually. Over time and through trial and error.Read More »

A Walk With Mary As We Prepare For Christmas

We invite you to journey with us over a series of six short biblical reflections, with Mother Mary, in the lead up to Christmas when Jesus was born.

Each reflection contemplates a specific event in Mary’s life, and is accompanied by a graphic and verses to help us in our personal reflection.

Mother Mary is our model of gentleness, humility and meekness. She teaches us to be silent, to pray and to contemplate. She is our Lord’s Mother, and she is our Mother.

May these reflections help us to walk with our gentle Mother, to entrust ourselves to her motherly care, and to inspire us to imitate the virtues of Mary, which are also the virtues of Christ.

And as we learn from Mary, we realise that she brings us closer to herself, and to her Son Jesus.

Part 1: The Annunciation: The Angel Gabriel Appears

The angel Gabriel was sent to Mary, to tell her that she will bear a Son whom she will name Jesus. Mary was confused, because she did not know how it could be possible, since she was a virgin. She was afraid, because she would be judged and condemned by the Law and people around her.

Yet, Mary believed the angel’s assurance, and trusted that the Lord would see her through the journey, so she replied, “I’m the Lord’s servant, let it be to me according to your word.”

Reflection:

We may not always fully understand why or how things will work out, and we may sometimes worry about the difficulties that we may face in our journey ahead.

Mary shows us that if we trust the Lord, He will see us through the journey. He will dispel our hesitations and fears, and He will give us the courage to say with Mary, “I’m the Lord’s servant, let it be to me according to your word.”

Verses to ponder:

[The angel] came to [Mary] and said, “Hail (Mary), full of grace, the Lord is with you!”
(Luke 1:28, RSVCE)

“I am the Lord’s servant,” said Mary; “may it happen to me as you have said.”
(Luke 1:38, GNT)


Above is part of the 1517 painting, “Visitation” by Raphael (Find out more: Wikipedia)

Part 2: The Visitation: Mary visits Elizabeth

After hearing from the Angel Gabriel that her cousin Elizabeth was pregnant even in her old age, Mary made an arduous journey through the hills and valleys to visit her cousin.

Elizabeth was already six months pregnant and Mary stayed for three more months, which meant Mary supported Elizabeth during the remainder of her pregnancy.

Reflection:

Mary teaches us that even though we may have our own worries, or we may be busy with our own activities, we can still pay attention to the needs of people around us.

Just as Mary helped Elizabeth in small ways, we can brighten the lives of others by running little errands, by offering a simple smile and greeting, or by just by spending time with them.

Verses to ponder:

“Mary got ready and hurried off to a town in the hill country of Judea. She went into Zechariah’s house and greeted Elizabeth.”
(Luke 1:39-40, GNT)

“Mary stayed about three months with Elizabeth and then went back home.”
(Luke 1:56, GNT)

Part 3: The Magnificat: Mary praises the Lord

Mary’s well-known song of praise, the Magnificat, is found in Luke 1:46 – 55. These words, “my soul magnifies the Lord,…” were spoken when Mary first met her cousin Elizabeth. [Find out more: Magnificat, Our Catholic Prayers]

In the Magnificat, Mary proclaimed the greatness of the Lord and said the Almighty had done great things for her. She did not exalt herself but recognised that God was working through his humble servant.

Reflection:

Mary teaches that we should never become proud or exalt ourselves. Rather we must recognise that it is the Lord who has given us good things.

She also teaches that if we are encountering difficulties in life, we can trust in the Lord to lift us up, reminding us to always stay humble and be grateful to God for His kindness towards us.

Verses to ponder:

“My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit rejoices in God my Savior… ”
(Luke 1:46-47, RSVCE)

“He who is mighty has done great things for me, and holy is His Name.”
(Luke 1:49, RSVCE)

Part 4: Mary journeys with Joseph to Bethlehem

Since the Emperor had ordered a census to be taken, Mary, now heavily pregnant, has to make the arduous trip with her husband Joseph to Bethlehem for registration.

Reflection:

When we are already burdened by worries, guilt or work, the last thing we want to hear are new edicts that add to our load. Yet Mary teaches us to humble ourselves, forget our ego, and learn to be meek, gentle, submissive and obedient.

Let us not forget that just as God provided Mary with a loving husband, Joseph, on this difficult journey, God will also send people to walk with us through our many trials and tribulations.

Verses to ponder:

“[Joseph] went to register with Mary, who was promised in marriage to him. She was pregnant …”
(Luke 2:5, GNT)

Part 5: The Nativity: Mary gives birth to Jesus, Mary our Mother

Mary was about to give birth and she was suffering from labour pains. However, Joseph and Mary could not find a proper room in the inn, and had to settle for a place where the farm animals lived.

When Mary eventually gave birth, she wrapped baby Jesus in cloths and laid him in a manger, which is a trough or container used to hold food for animals.

Reflection:

Mary shows we can be happy in a lowly place like the stable where Jesus was born, and there is no need for worldly riches or pleasures.

The image of Mother Mary wrapping Jesus in swaddling cloths also reminds us that she is our loving and gentle Mother, and we are her little children.

Verses to ponder:

“[Mary] gave birth to her firstborn son. She wrapped him in swaddling clothes and laid him in a manger, because there was no room for them in the inn.”
(Luke 2:7, NABRE)

Part 6: The Angels and the shepherds – Mary silently contemplates

When Jesus was born, angels appeared to shepherds, singing praises to God, and telling them about the birth of the Holy Child. The shepherds went to Bethlehem, and found Joseph, Mary, with baby Jesus lying in the manger.

The shepherds could not hold their joy and told Joseph and Mary what the angels have said.

Mary treasured these words in her heart, and pondered deeply about them.

Reflection:

This is one aspect of Mary that often draws us to her. Mary doesn’t speak much and is prayerful and contemplative. She took note of what happened and pondered about them day and night.

There’s a need for us to stay silent and humble, to pray, ponder and cling to Jesus and Mother Mary, and not get distracted by the many activities around us that may not be relevant.

Verses to ponder:

“[The shepherds] told them what the angel had said about the child.”
(Luke 2:17, GNT)

“Mary kept all these things, pondering them in her heart.”
(Luke 2:19, RSVCE)

====================================================
We hope you have enjoyed this 6-part series reflection on Mary this Advent!
====================================================

Reflections by Gabriel Liu
OLPS Communications Ministry

Taken from: http://www.olps.sg/walk-mary-we-prepare-christmas-1478#.XBdImrPQ7IU

Read More »

Advent Week-4: My spirit rejoices in God my savior. (Luke 1:47)

“Keep your face to the sunshine and you cannot see a shadow,” Helen Keller once said. What a remarkable statement coming from a woman who had been blind since infancy! Although Keller couldn’t actually see the sunlight, she knew it was there, and she also knew that it could overcome any shadow in her life.

In today’s Gospel, Mary has fixed her eyes on the source of all light, God the Father. Although Mary could have worried about what her neighbors might think or how she could possibly raise the Son of God, she chose instead to turn her thoughts toward the Lord. And because of this, her heart was filled with praise and rejoicing.

What a beautiful model for all of us to follow! Like Mary, we too can choose to fix our eyes on Jesus and his truth in Scripture. As we reflect on all that God has done for us, the desire to praise him and rejoice in his goodness to us will naturally well up in us. Then we will be able to pray, with Mary, “The Almighty has done great things for me, and holy is his Name.” (Luke 1:49)Read More »

Advent Week-3: Rejoice in the Lord always. I shall say it again: Rejoice! (Philippians 4:4)

Saint Paul believed that rejoicing was a basic disposition that we all should try to maintain, even when things don’t go our way. In his short Letter to the Philippians, in fact, he spoke about rejoicing fifteen times. And let’s not forget that Paul was in prison when he wrote the letter! He was not going to let his circumstances rob him of his joy.

So how did Paul maintain a joyful disposition? First, he rejoiced because he knew Jesus’ love. If you back up just two chapters in this letter, you’ll see him singing a hymn that extols Jesus’ willingness to empty himself, become a man, and die on the cross (Philippians 2:7-8). And then in the next chapter, he writes, “I even consider everything as a loss because of the supreme good of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord” (3:8). The thought of Jesus’ love–a love that gives of itself freely–continually filled Paul with joy.

Second, Paul rejoiced in the Philippians themselves. They were his joy and his crown (Philippians 4:1). They were his dear friends who had joined him in a “partnership for the gospel” (1:5). He rejoiced because he knew he had brothers and sisters who loved him and supported him in his faith.Read More »

Advent Week-2: He Choose us in Christ before the foundation of the world

Think back to a time when you were chosen for some special privilege or honor. Maybe your employer chose you for a position over other qualified applicants. Or perhaps your teammates chose you as captain because of you ability to lead others. It’s a good feeling to be singled out in such a way. Or think about how you felt when your future husband or wife chose to marry you and spend the rest of their life with you.

We believe that God chose Mary, before creation of the world, to be the Mother of God. And because he had chosen her for that unique role, he prepared her in a special way. He preserved her from original sin and gave her to two devout, faithful parents.

The God who chose Mary has also chosen you–and from the beginning of creation as well. He knew you. He intended for you to be born. He wanted you so much, in fact, that he sent his Son to redeem you.Read More »

Advent Week-1: “The Days Are Coming, Says The Lord…” (Jeremiah 33:14)

We often talk about “The Christmas Story,” as if it were one single story. Actually, it’s made up of a number of individual stories, each of which tells us something unique about the Christ child. The story of the Annunciation tells us about Mary’s openness to God’s plan. The story of Zechariah and Elizabeth tells us how John the Baptist – Jesus’ forerunner – was called at birth. The stories of the shepherds and the Magi tell us that Jesus is worth searching for.

There’s another story we don’t often think about because it’s not as long. It’s the story of the innkeeper whose closed doors led Mary and Joseph to the manger. But just imagine for a moment that he did manage to find room for them after all. His inn, not the manger, would be honored throughout the world. There would likely be a grand church marking its location, and pilgrims would flock to it year after year.

As Advent begins, let’s not be like the innkeeper. He missed a grand opportunity because he didn’t make room for Jesus.Read More »