5 Reasons & 10 Scriptures Why God Will Never Abandon You

You and Jesus share a desire for your comfort. But you and Jesus do not always agree on what kind of comfort is best for you. So, while you might feel frustrated over a very uncomfortable situation you’re being forced to deal with, Jesus is actually pursuing your long-term comfort through that very situation. It is in these seasons that Jesus’s promises to be with you always (Matthew 28:20) and to never forsake you (Hebrews 13:5) may not be so much comforting as they are bothersome or even painful. These are times you might wish that Jesus would just leave you alone.

But that’s not the nature or character of God. If you are God’s child, here are five reasons why God will never abandon you:

1. God desires your fellowship.

We were created for fellowship. God is faithful, who has called you into fellowship with his Son, Jesus Christ our Lord (1 Corinthians 1:9, NIV). Before sin entered the world in the Garden of Eden, Adam and Eve were more than just caretakers of God’s creation. They were part of that creation and enjoyed sweet communion with God in the garden. God didn’t change in His desires; man did. He still wants our fellowship (Revelations 3:20). Furthermore, you were created for His glory: “Bring all who claim me as their God, for I have made them for my glory. It was I who created them” (Isaiah 43:7, NLT). He even takes delight in you! (Zephaniah 3:17).Read More »

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Mary As The Figure Of The Church

Mary is essentially a Mother. She was predestined from all eternity, included in the very decree of the Incarnation, to be the Mother of the Son of God made man. In that predestination is included not only her physical or biological maternity in relation to her Son, but also her spiritual maternity in regard to all the redeemed children of God, the disciples of her Son. We shall return to this point further on.

All of God’s children, redeemed by Jesus’ blood, death and Resurrection, constitute the family of God which is the Church. Mary is thus, at the same time, Mother of the Church, of the people of God, of the pastors and the faithful.

This title, Mary, Mother of the Church, was solemnly proclaimed by Pope Paul VI on November 21, 1964, at the closing ceremony of the third session of Vatican II.

“The plan of salvation which orders the prefigurations of the Old Testament to fulfilment in the New Covenant likewise determines that Mary would live in a perfect way what was later to be fulfilled in the Church”, the Said late-Pope John Paul II, as he reflected on Mary as “the Church’s type and outstanding model in faith and charity”. Here is a translation of his catechesis, which was the 58th in the series on the Blessed Mother and was given in Italian.Read More »

The Mystery Of The Body And Blood Of Jesus Christ

Our Easter lectionary readings moved us through Christ’s Resurrection, Ascension, and the Descent of the Holy Spirit. Last Sunday, we celebrated the Most Holy Trinity, because we understood, from all that history, that God is Father, Son, and Holy Spirit; from the beginning, all Three Persons have lovingly worked to restore us to the life for which we were designed. We might, therefore, conclude that the history is now liturgically complete. Yet today, the Church calls us to another solemnity. In our readings, we are pondering the mystery of the Most Holy Body and Blood of our Lord in the Eucharist. This meal raises a question: If we now have the Holy Spirit to put God’s life in us, why do we need to “eat the Body” and “drink the Blood” of Christ? What does that accomplish that the gift of the Holy Spirit doesn’t?

Our Gospel reading begins midway through a long conversation Jesus had with people who tracked Him down after His miraculous feeding of the five thousand (Jn 6:25-50). They were looking for more bread, but Jesus used their physical hunger to direct their thoughts to another kind of bread: “For the bread of God is that which comes down from heaven, and gives life to the world” (Jn 6:33). It worked: “They said to Him, ‘Lord, give us this bread always’” (Jn 6:34).

Seeing they were interested, Jesus explained that He is the bread of life, and He called the Jews to believe in Him. In this part of the discussion, Jesus used imagery of bread and drink metaphorically: “he who comes to Me shall not hunger, and he who believes in Me shall not thirst” (Jn 6:35). When the Jews began to murmur at the suggestion that Jesus is bread from heaven (“Is this not Jesus, the son of Joseph, whose father and mother we know?”), He emphasized again that believing in Him is the source of eternal life: “Truly, truly I say to you, he who believes has eternal life” (Jn 6:47).Read More »

The Holy Trinity Explained

All Christians believe the doctrine of the Trinity. If you do not believe this—that is, if you have come to a settled conclusion that the doctrine of the Trinity is not true—you are not a Christian at all. You are in fact a heretic. Those words may sound harsh, but they represent the judgment of the Christian church across the centuries. What is the Trinity? Christians in every land unite in proclaiming that our God eternally exists as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Those who deny that truth place themselves outside the pale of Christian orthodoxy.

Having said that, I admit that no one fully understands it. It is a mystery and a paradox. Yet I believe it is true.

This diagram can be used to explain the Trinity’s “One God in Three Persons” nature, as follows:

The Father is God.
The Son (Jesus) is God.
The Holy Spirit is God.
The Father is not the Son.
The Son is not the Holy Spirit.
The Holy Spirit is not the Father.

We believe in one living and true God who is the Creator of heaven and earth; who is eternal, almighty, unchangeable, infinitely powerful, wise, just and holy.Read More »

6 Reasons to Celebrate Pentecost

Pentecost is considered by many as a denomination in some of today’s churches, but more important than that, Pentecost was and is a new birth experience. On that day of ”Pentecost”, God’s Holy Spirit came upon the waiting praying disciples, who had gathered with others in the upper room at Jerusalem. Their complete dedication and commitment to the Christ and His commission, evoked a mighty baptism of God’s power. This outpouring was evidenced initially by their speaking in tongues (Acts 2:4). The Spirit was resident in their lives from that moment as they witnessed many outstanding miraculous happenings (Acts 3:1-7; 4:31). As a result, they were able to lead victorious lives as Christians in Christ as a result of their Pentecostal experience.

It is important to note that on the ”Day of Pentecost”. In addition to the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, there were two baptisms disclosed. There was a baptism in the Holy Spirit with the evidence of speaking in other tongues, and the proclaiming of water baptism in the name of Jesus Christ by Peter (Acts 2:38). The baptism of the Holy Spirit is what Jesus referred to as being “born again” in John 3:3-7. The second baptism, was the fulfillment of Matthew 28:19, where Jesus commanded them to baptize in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.

Whether you have been observing Pentecost for years, or whether it is a completely new concept to you, here are a few reasons why celebrating Pentecost this year might be a good idea.Read More »

On The Feast Of Our Lady Of Fatima We Should Remember That Hell Is Real

When Our Lady appeared in 1917, the following year, she appealed to the children with her traditional message of reparation, penance, prayer and recitation of the Rosary. In her third apparition (there were six in all) she showed them a vision of hell and gave them another prayer to be recited after each decade of the Rosary: “O my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell and lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of Your Mercy.”

Yet it reminds us that hell is very real and much as we would rather not dwell on the fact, there are people who choose to go there. Indeed, in her fourth apparition, Our Lady directed the children to pray and offer sacrifices for sinners because “You know that many souls go to hell because there is none who pray for them.”

Read More: http://catholicherald.co.uk/commentandblogs/2016/05/13/on-the-feast-of-our-lady-of-fatima-we-should-remember-that-hell-is-real/

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On May 13, 1917, Lucia dos Santos, Francisco, and Jacinta Marto were, respectively, ten, nine, and seven years old. As we have said, the three children lived in Aljustrel, a hamlet of the township of Fatima.

After three apparitions of the Angel of Portugal in 1916, the children began to receive visits of a luminous Lady who later identified herself as “The Lady of the Rosary.” In Catholic language, “Our Lady of the Rosary” is the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mother of God made man.Read More »

10 Meanings of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ

“You are not losing Me, but I am going to be with you in a different way through My Spirit.”

The ascension of Jesus produced joy because the disciples realized what amazing benefits would come to them when Jesus returned to the Father. When Jesus ascended, all the promises regarding the Spirit’s ministry to the disciples were about to be fulfilled. The disciples accepted His ascension, for they had accepted Jesus’ word about the promised One to come. Their doubts and fears were gone. They were convinced of who He was. They knew that He died to forgive them of their sins. They knew He was alive from the dead. In His resurrection, they had hope in victory over death.

After Jesus rose from the dead, He “presented Himself alive” (Acts 1:3) to the women near the tomb (Matthew 28:9-10), to His disciples (Luke 24:36-43), and to more than 500 others (1 Corinthians 15:6). In the days following His resurrection, Jesus taught His disciples about the kingdom of God (Acts 1:3).

Forty days after the resurrection, Jesus and His disciples went to Mount Olivet, near Jerusalem. There, Jesus promised His followers that they would soon receive the Holy Spirit, and He instructed them to remain in Jerusalem until the Spirit had come. Then Jesus blessed them, and as He gave the blessing, He began to ascend into heaven. The account of Jesus’ ascension is found in Luke 24:50-51 and Acts 1:9-11.

It is plain from Scripture that Jesus’ ascension was a literal, bodily return to heaven. He rose from the ground gradually and visibly, observed by many intent onlookers. As the disciples strained to catch a last glimpse of Jesus, a cloud hid Him from their view, and two angels appeared and promised Christ’s return “in just the same way that you have watched Him go” (Acts 1:11).

Here are the 10 reasons why the Resurrection of Jesus Christ is meaningful;Read More »